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Stimulator


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The Stimulator is simultaneously nothing and yet a variety of things. It is what fly fishers refer to as an "attractor" pattern. Typically, an attractor pattern combines a number of aspects - something that the Stimulator does in spades. The Stimulator can be used to imitate caddis, stoneflies, hoppers, beetles, and cicada. It is extremely useful as an indicator fly; i.e., tie a nymph on a short length of monofilament off the hook bend and the fly acts as an indicator, not to mention potentially attracting a fish that may prove reluctant to take a dry, but then sees the nymph and takes that.

The Stimulator is relatively easy to tie and has acquired a level of popularity that virtually every fly shop has a few. The fly has become a "classic" and probably has far exceeded the expectation of its originator - Randall Kaufmann.

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Materials

Hook:Dai-Riki 1260 sizes 8 - 18
Thread:12/0 Red or Orange
Tail:Early season elk hair
AdbomenYellow dry fly dubbing
Rib:Copper wire
Adbomen Hackle:Brown dry fly saddle hackle
Wing:Early season elk hair
Head:Hot Orange Ice Dubbing
Head Hackle:Grizzly dry fly saddle hackle


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Tying Instructions

  1. Start your thread and coat the shank of the hook back to just above the barb.
  2. Cut, comb, and stack a small slump of Elk Hair for the Tail. It should be about a gap of the hook long and the tips should extend off the back of the hook.
  3. Tie in a piece of copper wire for the ribbing extending off the back of the hook.
  4. Dub a tapered abdomen starting where the tail was tied in and ending with approximately 30% of the shank of the hook left. It should be dubbed relatively thick, but donít get carried away.
  5. Tie in a Brown Saddle Hackle at the end of the abdomen the shiny side facing towards you.
  6. Wrap the hackle away from yourself and start with two wraps right at the front of the abdomen and then spiral wrap the rest back over the abdomen towards the tail in 4-5 wraps. Once you are at the tail use the copper wire that you tied in for the ribbing to secure the hackle at the tail. Make a wrap directly on top and then spiral wrap the thread back up the abdomen working towards the eye of the hook. Try not to lock down too many hackle fibers on the way up to your thread. Once you get to your thread tie off the copper wire with your bobbin thread.
  7. Cut, comb, and stack a relatively good chunk of Elk Hair to form the wing. It needs to be enough to cover the top 180 degrees of the abdomen once tied in. The Wing should be tied in directly on top of the hook and extend to roughly the midpoint of the tail. When it is secure cut the butts of the wing off at an angle to help form the taper of the thorax. The wing should be covering the top 180 degrees of the top of the hook.
  8. Cut, comb, and stack a relatively good chunk of Elk Hair to form the wing. It needs to be enough to cover the top 180 degrees of the abdomen once tied in. The Wing should be tied in directly on top of the hook and extend to roughly the midpoint of the tail. When it is secure cut the butts of the wing off at an angle to help form the taper of the thorax. The wing should be covering the top 180 degrees of the top of the hook.
  9. Dub a thorax that tapers off the wing down to the eye of the hook. It should start at the same diameter that the abdomen ended at and then taper down smoothly to the eye of the hook.
  10. In 4-5 evenly spaced wraps, wrap the hackle through the thorax to the eye of the hook. Tie it off and clip it. Whip Finish.


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